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Not really. You could have been within a few thousand miles of this collision and survived. In fact, it would be well below your ability to notice if it were 1 AU away.

http://www.scottaaronson.com/blog/?p=2651

Needless to say, you would not survive if 1 solar mass of energy were released in any other form (even neutrinos). The key feature is that that tremendous amount of energy results in only a minuscule deformation of spacetime, i.e., spacetime is extremely stiff.

By the way, the distances are way smaller than merely subatomic. The strain sensitivity is 10^-21, which for the ~ 1 km arms of LIGO is a shift of just 10^-8 the width of an atom.




> you would not survive if 1 solar mass of energy were released in any other form (even neutrinos)

But it is close!

A supernova releases "few times 10^45 J of neutrino energy" [1], so let's say 5. 5e45 J is about 6e28 kg, while solar mass is 2e30 kg. And neutron radiation from a supernova would get fatal when closer than about 2.3 AU [2]. So we have a factor of 30 from the masses and a factor of 5 (1^2 AU vs. 2.3^2 AU) from the distance.

So about 1/150 of solar mass released in neutron radiation would be survivable at the distance of 1 AU.

[1] http://wayback.archive.org/web/20120313045458/http://www.and...

[2] https://what-if.xkcd.com/73/


Yea, I mentioned this because I just read it a couple of days ago :)




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