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If anyone is curious about the sample text:

* "All their equipment and instruments are alive." (Mr. Spaceship, by Philip K. Dick)

* "A red flair silhouetted the jagged edge of a wing." (The Jewels of Aptor, by Samuel R. Delany)

* "I watched the storm, so beautiful yet terrific." (Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley)

* "Almost before we knew it, we had left the ground." (A Trip to Venus, by John Munro)

* "A shining crescent far beneath the flying vessel." (Triplanetary, by E. E. Smith)

* "It was going to be a lonely trip back." (Youth by Isaac Asimov)

* "Mist enveloped the ship three hours out from port." (The Jewels of Aptor, by Samuel R. Delany)

* "My two natures had memory in common." (Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, by Robert Louis Stevenson)

* "Silver mist suffused the deck of the ship." (The Jewels of Aptor, by Samuel R. Delany)

* "The face of the moon was in shadow." (Mr. Spaceship, by Philip K. Dick)

* "She stared through the window at the stars." (The Millionaire's Convenient Bride, by Catherine George) ????

* "The recorded voice scratched in the speaker." (Deathworld, by Harry Harrison)

* "The sky was cloudless and of a deep dark blue." (A Trip to Venus, by John Munro)

* "The spectacle before us was indeed sublime." (A Trip to Venus, by John Munro)

* "Then came the night of the first falling star." (The War of the Worlds, H. G. Wells)

* "Waves flung themselves at the blue evening." (The Jewels of Aptor, by Samuel R. Delany)




The first one on the list had convinced me this was a very interestingly-trained Markov chain generator. I need to read more Philip K. Dick.


Who still remembers MegaHal?

https://megahal.alioth.debian.org/

Some of my favorites:

COULD SHAKE MY TINY FIST AND SWEAR I WASN'T WRONG, BUT WHAT'S THE SENSE IN ARGUING WHEN YOU'RE MUCH TOO BUSY RETURNING TO THE LAVATORY.

AMAZING GRACE, HOW SWEET THE SOUND OF ONE OR MORE NUMBERS REPRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORM.

SATAN GUIDES US TELEPATHICLY THROUGH RECTAL THERMOMETERS. WHY DO YOU THINK ABOUT META-REASONING?


Looking through the "Classic Quotes" list, it's apparent that MegaHAL was a big They Might Be Giants fan.


That's always an appropriate state of mind. And luckily, that story is already in the public domain: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/32522

As are a few others: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/33399


There's actually more PD PKD than that, but some of it's only available as scans rather than text. And some of his works has disputed PD status, eg. there was some kind of tussle between the Dick estate and the makers of The Adjustment Bureau over its PD status.


If you want something that reads like a Markov chain output, try reading his Exegesis (basically written after/about his mental breakdown - it's fascinating, but makes his novels look like like reading)


I'm Indian and I'm seeing a lot of Hindi fonts on the front page with lines from Hindi novels as well

Nice little attention to detail!


Those are not lines from hindi novels, rather translations of the lines from the novels, as cited by GP above.

"All their equipment and instruments are alive." as "उनके सभी औज़ार और उपकरण किसी ना किसी स्वरूप में ज़िंदा हैं"


There are also longer texts that you see if you change "Sentence" to "Paragraph". I don't know if they're from elsewhere in the same works or not.


They're from books too. A Trip to Venus and The Time Machine


Refreshing to see something other than lorem ipsum.


Also, lazy dogs who find themselves jumped over by speedy brown foxes.


While being watched by stone human-lions that are adored by birds.


not facetiously, it's like the shortest possible follow-on to a progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable


How do companies like Google come up with the sample text?


"She stared through the window at the stars" is just too common a phrase :-) A simple google search suggests a hit in atleast 3-4 books.


Seems like there would be one that fits the theme though, no?


There isn't actually many results at all for that exact phrase, as far as I can see. It looks likely that it's a modification of "he stared through the window at the stars", which doesn't occur much more often, but did appear in A Voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay.




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