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The research got computers to execute code on them without authorization and extracted information from them.

That is a crime under the CFAA in the USA. Not sure what it is in Germany/EU.




"Your honor, my client created and published a software library. The so-called victims here wrote code that specifically referenced my client's software library, by name mind you. My client in no way compelled or solicited the victims to do so. Now how can that be called 'without authorization?'"


> "Your honor, my client created and published a software library. The so-called victims here wrote code that specifically referenced my client's software library, by name mind you. My client in no way compelled or solicited the victims to do so. Now how can that be called 'without authorization?'"

The prosecuting attorney is going to tell a jury of twelve of your non-technical "peers" that it is hacking.

Your client can either go to trial for seventeen thousand two hundred and eighty nine counts of felony hacking, and risk half a million years in prison, or they can plea bargain to 5 years in prison and a felony on his record.

Or your client can hang himself, but I'm pretty sure a federal prosecutor counts that as a win too.


Yup. I'm surprised an advisor would sign off on this thesis.


That's an interesting point. Is there any case law on negligence versus malice?


What about Android apps (like Facebook) that collect phone numbers, contact lists, geolocation data, record sound without any user authorization?




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