Hacker News new | past | comments | ask | show | jobs | submit login

It's interesting that at least twice in these comments someone has claimed that this was a desktop technology that was going to ruin servers, and when server using professionals reply that it's really good for servers they get what read to be quite angry responses.

I don't know much about it, but even from my position of ignorance it's clear that the level of debate is very low.




I wonder how many of those servers are web hosts.

There seems to be a line drawn where those that do web hosting and similar love systemd, while other server admins loath it for introducing needless complexities.

I have taken to thinking about web hosting as "uptime by machine gun". This in that they achieve uptime not by maintaining solid server configs, but by rapidly firing containers and/or VMs at the problem until it goes away.

http://www.commitstrip.com/en/2015/07/08/true-story-fixing-a...


Seems to be true since the famous "400 restarts a day is OK"

http://harmful.cat-v.org/software/ruby/rails/is-a-ghetto


dear deity...


Was my response angry? Was not my intention - I just wanted to point out where the grudge is coming from.

I guess the debate is so toxic because it's a perfect bikeshedding topic everyone that uses Linux can somehow participate in. Some sysadmins are surely frustrated because it breaks the way they worked in the past years, others are happy about the new features.

I'm undecided but if I read this https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11675129 I'm really feeling uncormfortable. Hitting this and debugging it seems like a nightmare. So I guess it's a win and eases a lot of pain points for ordinary users but make the live of specialists a lot harder. I can imagine how you hitting these bugs regularly turns you into posting something in the angry territory.

On the other hand the debate is now mostly technical (except some trolls).




Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | Legal | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: