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I'm a recruiter (yeah, yeah, recruiters know nothing) and I'm going to call this as a fail. It's INCREDIBLY hard to get even one person employed. The bar is so high at most employers that almost every applicant gets rejected.

So the likelihood of all members of a given set of X people being employed is almost zero.

What happens to the team dynamic when the employer wants to employ Jenny and Steve but not Bill, Mike and Vivek?

This might sound good but it aint going to work.




That argument assumes the probability of Bill, Mike, and Vivek being hired is independent of them applying with Jenny and Steve. Bill might do better in an interview if Jenny is present. Or if Steve gets to vouch for him during the process. And the quality of the people who apply as a team may be higher than those who apply individually.

This is basically just acqui-hiring without the acquisition. And acqui-hires are common enough -- not as common as straight up hiring, but enough to be interesting.


As far as I know acqui-hires hire the whole team. Here they may pick only some team members.


from the article:

If we make an offer, we’ll make it to all of you, at the same time; you’d all be free to accept or decline individually, but of course we’d hope you’d all accept — and if you do, we’d work with all of you to find a place at Stripe where you can all start off working together.


This has been a common practice in enterprise sales organizations for while.

- Hire new CRO or President of sales.

- He "builds out a team" generally consisting of people he's already worked with in the past.

- Sales org grows.

- CRO moves to next company. wash rinse repeat ad infinitum.

Why would this process breakdown given a team of proven, successful engineers who have shown to be capable of building/scaling a product in the past?


Why not the same?

Cause sales ain't software.


Care to explain what the relevant differences are?


Among other factors, salespeople have a large variable component to their compensation. They tend to be highly economic animals in a way that most engineers are not. Hence a former boss can easily convince them to join up by making a compelling argument about their prospective earnings.


Between software engineers and salespeople? Really?

A better question would be "what do they have in common?"


Fail? They wrote a blog post and setup an email alias. It's not like they have a real cost of failure here. Besides, they already reached #1 on HN. That's a hell of a lot more success than most recruiters achieve in a week.


Well yes I concede maybe as a recruiting/marketing gimmick it is a success.


I think (know) many companies actually do this informally all the time. It's fairly common to hire designers in particular this way. Stripe is smart to formally and publically announce a streamlined process. Obviously the whole point here is either everyone or no one gets an offer - honestly if I had to guess the amount of people they actually hire this way will be really small, but making it formal will increase the number of talented people they see total.


> I'm a recruiter (yeah, yeah, recruiters know nothing) and I'm going to call this as a fail. It's INCREDIBLY hard to get even one person employed. The bar is so high at most employers that almost every applicant gets rejected.

To be a bit blunt here: I've only experienced once that talking to a recruiter helped for anything. (OK, twice if I'm generous, it wasn't a recruiter, it was a hiring manager at a consulting company and I ended up rejecting the job.)

I have however sold myself in a number of times the last few years.

So if anyone in recruiting needs a good idea, here is one:

* do get back to devs with updates, not only customer

* know what you are talking about, don't ask if I still know how to bike (or program) just because I haven't been doing it full time in 12 months

* do sell

* in Europe


Also: * Java != JavaScript


I generally don't have a hard time getting hired, nor do the people I work best with. I mean it's trivially true that p(A and B) is probably smaller than p(A) or p(B) alone, but I don't think that's what you were getting at.

Could you be experiencing a bias because of your deal/people flow?


>The bar is so high at most employers that almost every applicant gets rejected.

There might be some network bias here since it sounds like your experience (first- and second-hand data) is from outside recruiter-referred candidates.


if Jenny and Steve are really good, you can always give them more stock and let go of Bill, Mike and Vivek at a later point.




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