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Bit of a major screw up there. If they'd been open about the source they probably could have fixed it. Even now googling Cholera prevention it mostly seems to be sorted by chlorinating the water supply and using bleach on cholera contaminated stuff - not rocket science and could probably be done without $2bn. When I'm 3rd world travelling I tend to figure if the tap water smells of chlorine you're ok.

Funny seeing the London map. My flat's on that. Thankfully we have less cholera these days. I remember being struck in Nepal about 20 years ago by seeing some guy crapping directly on the river bed of the main river in Kathmandu which was probably being used for water by villages downstream. Again some of this stuff is not rocket science.




It's been widely known that the UN peacekeepers originated the outbreak for years now. The issue isn't closed source data, it's the UN being organizationally incapable of holding people responsible for fuck ups.

EDIT: Recent example - http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/20/opinion/sunday/i-love-the-...


So if you come to a bar with the flu and get me sick should I hold you responsible for fuck ups? Or maybe the bar? What if one of their workers is the one with the flu?

I'm not sure it's comparable, flu only kills 4x more people as cholera and honestly I'd personally like it if I could sue people for getting me sick by going out to public places when they know they are sick. (A friend of mine just gloated on twitter that he probably got 100 people sick by attending a meetup with the flu.)

That said, since most people don't seem to agree with me and just take it as normal that sicknesses get passed on with a ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ type attitude I guess I'm unsure how to hold the UN any more responsible.


> honestly I'd personally like it if I could sue people for getting me sick by going out to public places when they know they are sick

You definitely can do this. They'd need to have something more serious than the flu. Forcible quarantine for severe communicable diseases is a feature of US law.

> flu only kills 4x more people as cholera

How many people have the flu, vs how many having cholera?


He'd only need to sue for damages because they violated reasonable self-quarantine principles and put him and others at risk - not force the state to actually quarantine them.

And he could definitely sue. USA!


It's not like this was inevitable, had the UN peacekeepers simply setup adequate sanitation, they wouldn't have polluted and infected so many Haitians.


I had no idea UN was so bad. I've heard so many stories of their failures. But I didn't realize it was systemic. That makes a lot more sense now, understanding those stories in the context of a nepotistic bureaucratic mess.

Reminds me of modern universities where 75-90% of the expense is going to administrators instead of the core service (education). Which is a big reason why tuition keeps rising.


> it mostly seems to be sorted by chlorinating the water supply

Haiti is still in a poor state following the 2010 earthquake. Many communities do not have access to a reliable water supply. I have no idea about the costs, but it would no at all shock me to find it would cost $2 billion (or more) to get the entire population access to reliable water supplies that could be treated appropriately.

Not sure why the water access isn't getting more press given its direct relation to disease.


One jug of bleach per person would give everyone clean water for years. Even at $10 per jug that's only 100 million


Wow, you've really solved this!




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