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Ah. Now we see the end of the beginning of the age of IoT.

I have consistently complained that these companies are completely deficient in requiring some cloud service (read: other peoples' servers). And guess why I had those issues? Because they offload all processing to these machines to retain control of them.

I am not against companies trying to make a buck. Instead of tying your service that will explode, support open standards like MQTT, CoAP, and AMQP. Doing anything less shows to me that your business is a house of cards.




> Because they offload all processing to these machines to retain control of them.

That makes it sound like their primary concern is keeping control of the devices. In reality I think it's just laziness. We all know how much easier it is to support code running on a server than to support code running on hardware sitting on somebody's dusty garage shelf with no internet connection.


> That makes it sound like their primary concern is keeping control of the devices. In reality I think it's just laziness.

I sincerely believe that many of these entrants into IoT do want to remain in control of the devices and the users who "rent" said hardware. I've seen laziness in code before. It's usually sloppy, unmaintained/badly maintained, and just messy.

These products are polished, just work, and smooth... and make you go through their systems. That's an intentionally designed system.

> We all know how much easier it is to support code running on a server than to support code running on hardware sitting on somebody's dusty garage shelf with no internet connection.

Indeed true. I'm not advocating axing out those features. I said to add in another: which is to use open standards as well.

I also develop IoT hardware (not for sale). I use Arduino Nanos, nRF24L01+ radio chips, whatever sensors/actuators for the hardware. For the software, I use Node-Red, Mosquitto (MQTT server), and Apache NiFi. For "cloud support", I use Tor Hidden Services at every gateway machine, and communicate between .onion addresses. I effectively treat all my machines in the world as a simple ethernet hub. I'm just an individual, and was able to figure all this out.


> I'm just an individual, and was able to figure all this out.

Getting something to work one time is not remotely the same task as getting it to work for every user, every time. Getting the setup you described to work correctly is doable. Getting that setup to work for everyone who takes a box off the Home Depot shelf and plugs it in? That's hundreds of times more work. Writing a nice UI is a piece of cake in comparison. I'm still inclined to see laziness here rather than malice.

Not that it matters. The end result is the same either way: devices that spy on you unless they get bricked. I wonder if the 1984 Big Brother webcam had more than a two-year warranty.


It's definitely one of their primary concerns. If they use open standards, then other manufacturers (most likely Chinese ones with access to the latest highly-integrated bargain basement chips) can come in and undercut their pricing. Tech companies - especially VC-funded ones - are very aware of the importance of a moat around their product to stop this from happening. If they can get ongoing monthly revenue out of it now or in the future, even better.


That's why I'm waiting for the Chinese shops to start making standards-compliant gear. I will gladly buy it and recommend others to buy.

I'm sick and tired of the US 'business playground' antics. A certain VC funding group is also well known for bad antics, although they got their client company slapped down by a rogue hacker for lockdown antics :) Imagine that.

http://hackaday.com/2014/11/18/thalmic-labs-shuts-down-free-...


The Internet of Bricked Things.




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