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Being the best ranked player != playing well beyond humans. When the AI can play 1,000 games and never lose that's well beyond people.

Granted, chess AI is basically at that point right now. But, go AI has a ways to go.




Given the leaps of progress made between this series of games and the previous series in only a few months, I'd expect "never lose" will become a recognized reality in about a year.


Possibly, it's not clear if AlphaGo is playing better or simply approaching the game differently. Game five was close and AlphaGo seemed to mostly win due to time considerations.

PS: Honestly, it might be a year or a decade, but I suspect there is plenty of headroom to drastically surpass human play.


When AlphaGo does lose, it seems to happen when outright bugs cause it to make moves that are readily recognizable as mistakes. It doesn't seem to happen because it's not quite "smart" enough, or because its underlying algorithms are fundamentally flawed.

That's a big difference. Bugs can be identified and fixed. By the time AlphaGo faces another top professional (Ke Jie?) we can safely assume that whatever went wrong in Game 4 won't happen again.

Consider how much stronger the system has become in the few months since the match against Fan Hui. Another advance like that will place it far beyond the reach of anything humans will ever be able to compete with.


> When AlphaGo does lose, it seems to happen when outright bugs cause it to make moves that are readily recognizable as mistakes

I'm not sure this is true. It made the wrong move at move 79 in game 4, but I'm not sure that should be considered an obvious mistake.

My understanding is that the moves that people said were most obviously mistakes later in the game were a result of it being behind (and desperately trying to swing the lead back in its favor), rather than a cause.




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