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A few more thoughts:

1. This effectively poisons the well for any other BaaS providers out there. If two of the biggest companies in this space (StackMob and Parse) can get acquired and shut down in less than 5 years, what does that say about the future of the smaller companies in this space? As a developer how could you possibly trust any of these companies going forward, based on this track record?

2. Syncing is notoriously difficult to get right. Building a generalized syncing solution is even harder. Bugs in sync code tend to lead to data loss, which leads to angry customers. These types of bugs are hard enough to track down and fix in your own code. Trying to track down and fix bugs in complex third-party code can be damn near impossible.

If you decide to adopt a third party solution that purports to do your syncing for you, do your research carefully. Not just by looking at the toy samples which look easy to set up and work perfectly, but experiences and reports from actual developers who have tried such solutions. What kind of problems are they having? What are the limitations of the current implementation? How mature is the product? How responsive are they to bug reports? If something goes wrong and data is lost, how much insight do you have into the system to figure out why?




This will definitely make me more wary in the future. I considered both Parse and Firebase for my app's backend and even did some early prototypes using each. Parse ended up being closest to what I needed for the basic app features. I would have used Firebase for real time syncing in a multiplayer version but decided to put multiplayer on hold so I could actually just deploy something.

I kind of got lucky dodging the Parse bullet -- it was only because I quickly saw in my Parse-based prototype I was going to go over the ~1M interactions per month allowed by the free tier. At the time, the tier I could tell I'd be headed for ratcheted up to something like $100/month. I decided I'd rather just build it myself. Obviously, I'm glad I did now. Mostly because I'm on to some other things now and would hate to have to be rebuilding at this point just to keep my humble (yet very much alive and being used) app running.


On the other hand, Google seems to be doubling down on Firebase. I guess the difference is that Google (cloud division) is an infrastructure provider, whereas Facebook is a fundamentally a consumer product.


Au contraire: it opens a wider deeper well. Parse customers are now up for grabs. Do you think they will go back to program back-ends and rent a server? I personally won't.

So the supermaket chain where you usually shop at closes its stores for whatever reason. Do you go back to farming your backyard or do you find a new store?

The BAAS industry is super young, only hipsters are into it. But it makes sense so it will eventually mature. Bugs will be fixed.


Switching supermarkets is much, much, easier than switching backends. I'm sure lot more BaaS companies will pop up to grab former Parse customers. I'm not sure how many of those will still be around in another 5 years.

I strongly suspect there's something negative about the economics of BaaS services that's being implied by the fact that two of the most successful providers have shut down after acquisition.


Amazon has fully embraced BaaS. And I don't know of any AWS services they've added and then removed. I think Amazon will be the winner here. MSFT is also starting to embrace BaaS. Of course they have a less stellar history of support.


> Of course they [MSFT] have a less stellar history of support.

Microsoft supported products: Azure - six years, .Net & Active Directory - thirteen years, SQL Server - seventeen years, Visual Studio - nineteen years, and Excel - twenty nine years.


True but they still lack a wrapped and simple to use solution like Parse. That is why I run everything on AWS except the BAAS.


True. I oversimplified. On the other hand: maybe they were acquired to buy the tech but to shutdown the business?


That's exactly our thought (hasura.io) while we prepare for our "launch" next week. We've been studying Parse's growth and are definitely going after their market. Our core philosophy with the BaaS is however to keep it as open as possible. We wrote this up in response to Parse shutting down: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=10994104


Is it production ready?


Yes! We have over 20 apps build on in during our alpha phase - ranging from e-commerce to payment wallets. Let us know if you'd be interested to try out the beta version releasing next week. You can write to us at build@hasura.io or @HasuraHQ.


What if you didn't do it via sync?

What if everything was built around streams that multiple people could read and write to and each stream would have a server that would be the authority on which operation done in which order?

I think that's a more flexible system that can include sync, but also other things.

That's what I've spent years building, and I'm hoping to make it also a completely distributed solution that works across domains:

http://qbix.com/platform/guide/messages


Had a look at the link and struggling to understand the concept of streams.

A primary benefit of sync is store-and-forward, i.e. I could be offline, change a customer record, and when I reconnect it syncs to those who need it via a server.

In the streams model, how does the server know which stream messages to send to a client that's been offline for a week, if not via sync?

Also, messages. Does a message equate to, say, a customer record? I read that a message is a record of an event that happened to something?


> This effectively poisons the well for any other BaaS providers out there. If two of the biggest companies in this space (StackMob and Parse) can get acquired and shut down in less than 5 years, what does that say about the future of the smaller companies in this space? As a developer how could you possibly trust any of these companies going forward, based on this track record?

Especially given the fact that the very goal of most VC companies is acquisition.


I would argue that this precisely is the reason for that many shut downs after acquisition. They don't make their business to be sustainable, rarely profitable even.




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