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The node.js aspect of Calypso is actually pretty minimal, basically to build the shell of the web page. WordPress and PHP still power the API behind Calypso as well as the entire front-end of the site (i.e., what your readers see when they visit your blog). I don't think either of them are going away anytime soon.

The .org community (self-hosted WordPress) is also getting serious about API-based interactions, so this isn't an entirely new direction. I think we'll be seeing front-end JavaScript becoming more and more important there as well. There's still a lot to figure out, but I think the open-sourcing of Calypso that happened today will make it easier to share ideas with the greater WordPress community.




> The .org community (self-hosted WordPress) is also getting serious about API-based interactions, so this isn't an entirely new direction.

Indeed, we're shipping the first half of the core REST API with 4.4 (just about to hit RC), and the rest in the next release.


I just learned about jetpack - does anyone know why the functionality there requires a wordpress.com account (or rather, are there any efforts towards being able to self-host that part?)?

In the same vein, the wordpress.com api does indeed appear to be rather well documented -- shouldn't it be rather easy to implement enough of that to allow using this new web-app for interfacing with it? (Even if most of the calls just return 403 or 500 - presumably the app handles that somewhat gracefully)?


My hope is that we (the core REST API team) will be able to work with the Automattic/WordPress.com REST API team to harmonise the two, yeah. :)

(There are some things in the WP.com API that don't make sense for self-hosted sites, and vice versa.)


> does anyone know why the functionality there requires a wordpress.com account (or rather, are there any efforts towards being able to self-host that part?)?

The list is long: http://jetpack.me/features/ (probably half of those require the connection)

Examples include stats (a pain to scale on shared hosting), related posts (also known to kill database servers), site uptime monitoring, image CDN (including on the fly thumbnailing), and so on.

It basically provides the things that you probably don't want to self-host. You get some of the scaling of WordPress.com while being able to do your own thing (plugins, custom theme, etc.).


Oh, but I could care less about stats, related posts, site uptime -- if I could get a shiny new ui to do the basics (write posts). That's what I mean - if all the crap I don't care about could just return 403/500 - how much work would it be to get the stuff I need to work with the new SPA?




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