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>"Such data would consist of a basic domain address, and not a full browsing history of pages within that site or search terms entered."

Am I right in understanding they will have access to this data without a warrant? And then any 'further' data would then need a warrant.

>"For more intrusive surveillance - involving the detailed content of the communications - security services need to obtain a warrant."

So with more and more websites using https, where does this 'detailed content' come from? Is the Government expecting ISPs to collect data that doesn't exist? As far as I was aware, as long as you view a website in HTTPS, there was no way your ISP knew what individual pages you are visiting.




The full text hasn't been released yet - just going on statements over the last few days. It's likely that you'll have to give the government your private keys, or be able to decrypt any encrypted communication that passes through your network.

Again, it's likely unenforceable, in no small part as there's no such thing as a "communications provider", which is the term they keep on using. Skype, Apple, etc., don't work in a vacuum - data transits via peers (are they communications providers?), your computer (is that a communications provider?), your ISP (they're almost certainly a communications provider), and so-on.

The purpose of this bill is likely to break large tech corps, rather than smaller operators, but it could also have the effect of essentially closing the technology market to all but large operators who can afford to be compliant.


The term "communications provider" is defined under UK law, though the practical meaning of the term is less clear: http://aa.net.uk/legal-cp.html


    > Am I right in understanding they will have access to
    > this data without a warrant? 
Second line of the article:

    > The police and security services will have to get
    > permission to access the content and councils will be
    > banned from trawling the records.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34691956

>"Police will be able to see websites people have visited but not the specific pages they have viewed without a warrant, under new government plans."

Different parts of different articles seem to hint at different things. I guess we wont know everything until the final proposal is released.


> but not the specific pages they have viewed without a warrant, under new government plans."

No worries, there is another paragraph for this.

> The new powers could include giving Britain’s spying agencies the power to take over a phone remotely and access all of the documents – including text messages and emails – and photos that are stored on it. They will then be able to install software that will allow them to look in on the messages and data of people at any time, according to reports.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/new...


This is behind the belief that so called 'black boxes' will be mandatory. i.e. state required man in the middle attacks on all your https content.




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