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If you're using vanilla vim I don't think there's a whole lot neovim will offer you at present. I think there will eventually be some performance improvements in the core areas, but they haven't really started on that yet.

Async support is a big deal for a lot of people though (and it's neovims original raison d'etre). For example, not having :make (well, :Neomake) block on compile is pretty significant by itself. Under the hood getting real async tasks required/requires a ton of rewriting because of how Vim was architected. Those changes were made deliberately and weren't just so that they could use all these fancy new libraries.

So I guess I'd liken it to Windows when it went from the 98 days to WinNT/2000 - keeping things working about the same while laying the foundation for bigger improvements later.

On the other hand, I don't see much downside to moving to neovim either. It is interchangeable (in my experience) with vanilla.




> If you're using vanilla vim I don't think there's a whole lot neovim will offer you at present.

My vimrc is 80 lines, I don't feel it's vanilla at all, but I don't use :make or probably any other commands that launch subtasks so I guess this is what sets me apart.


I meant more with the plugins, but in any case regular vim isn't going anywhere either. I think there's eventually supposed to be hooks for building better GUIs and external integration, which will probably be the turning point when a lot more people switch over.




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