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I work at a security company and sometimes reverse engineer systems and/or code to see if it is vulnerable to a plethora of attacks.

Presumably the only reason a closed source vendor would be against someone reversing their source is because they're afraid someone will steal their ideas and/or redistribute their code for free.

That not being my goal I really couldn't care less. I'll just go ahead and reverse whatever I want whenever I want. I value my security, and that of clients, over some legal piece of toilet-paper. Everyone who doesn't agree, should reconsider. Do you truly believe that people should not be allowed to look at code that is running on their systems for their security's sake? I will not redistribute what I learnt, but I will analyse it to see if it is safe.

If you didn't want me looking, you should not have put it out in the open.




I'm pretty sure there are a lot of enterprise software vendors who want their products to be inscrutable so that after you buy it you need to hire their consultants to tune it to perform acceptably for you. If you understand how it works, you might be able to stop being a part of those extra revenue streams.


> against someone reversing their source is because they're afraid someone will steal their ideas

I was once at a startup and another company in Texas released a product with identical typos as found in our object code.

Selling that software was how I got money to pay rent and buy food to put into my food-hole, so I'm going to feel a little more sympathy for people who want to stop others from reverse-engineering their stuff.


Reverse-engineering for personal inspection, and selling software with stolen code are two different things. The company in Texas you talk about was doing the latter.




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